Welcome to The Senate Site

Wednesday, May 17, 2006

15 kilobytes of fame

By Peter Knudson
Utah Senate Majority Leader

Last week's Stateline.org article, by Kavan Peterson, directed some extra attention to the Senate Site. Here are a few comments (deserved or not) from our shipmates sailing the New Media Sea:
13th Floor
"Talk about variety. The Utah Senate has a blog that one day has pols and citizens squabbling over how to spend a $1 billion surplus, and on another suggests that lawmakers head for the Senate freezer because it is packed with Aggie ice cream, courtesy of Utah State University."

Groundbuzz
"For real! They’re blogging and actually have citizen commentary! We need some more of this. The “Unofficial Voice of the Utah State Senate Majority” is a bold step that more legislative bodies should be taking."

PinkDome
"When I think of Utah, the first thing that usually comes to mind is "legislative blogging." Naturally then, Utah's state Senate became the first legislative body to have its own blog."

A Capitol Blog
"Interaction and greater communication is certainly the idea the Utah Senate had when it started the Utah state Senate's blog. It was started as the unofficial journal of the state Senate Republican majority. Did you hear that Texas? Yes sir, you heard that right - blogging Republicans."

Technometria

"What makes this blog work is what makes every blog work in the end: writing that interests people, openness, and a human voice. This isn’t a collection of press releases. These are posts by real people, explaining in their own words why they’re doing what they’re doing."

Shades of Blue
"Now HERE'S a trend I'd like to start!! Wouldn't this be interesting? Hmmmm - bringing the people's voices directly to their legislators and vice versa. Might be illuminating for both ends..."

First Reading
"Legislative blogs are adding their presence to the rapidly growing blogosphere."

and

Stateline.org
"Joining the nation’s growing proliferation of political Web logs, or blogs, the Utah site was the first of its kind to strike up a digital dialogue that included entries not just from state Senate Republicans but also from minority Democrats and lawmakers in the opposite chamber. Unfolding comment by comment, the unofficial daily log often paralleled official debate taking place under the dome - with the added bonus of anonymity."

Well, we appreciate the thoughtful comments, but are very aware that we have much to learn - and that we've only just begun to tap the potential of these new technologies. These are uncharted waters for a legislative body, but we hope we’re adding something of value to the democratic process.

E-mail us or post a comment anytime. In the final analysis, this blog site belongs to you - the citizens of our great state. We hope this site becomes an avenue for more and more people to participate in our legislative process.

We'd love to hear your insight and suggestions for sailing these waters.

4 Comments:

Anonymous JB said...

I too think the senatesite.com blog is a great idea. I really like the idea of posting some thoughts about the issues our elected officials are facing up there on the hill. I've never felt so involved in politics!

Thanks for the site.
JB

5/17/2006 12:33 PM  
Blogger Utah Conservative said...

You do have a great site!

5/17/2006 12:42 PM  
Blogger The Senate Site said...

Thanks JB and U.C.

This blog site is a two-way street, and your comments over the past several months have added value. Keep 'em coming!

JB's words hit home: "I've never felt so involved in politics." That's exactly what we're tying to do do: engage you a little deeper and more effectively in the policy making process. After all, it's your country, your state, your Senate, and your blog site. We're glad you are on board. Stay active and engaged, and maybe you'll be up here posting blogs as a senator someday.

5/17/2006 7:35 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

eMarket Fuel said:

"Utah breaks the mold.... The site allows for talk from both sides of the aisle, as well as (and imagine this) feedback from the public. Is there a more low impact and effective way to increase ongoing communication with constituents?"

6/01/2006 1:48 PM  

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